Keb’ Mo’

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Photo by Jeremy Cowart

Keb’ Mo’

Since arriving on the scene in the early 1990s, Kevin Roosevelt Moore (rechristened Keb’ Mo’ around 1994) has earned a reputation for his mastery of multiple blues styles, his ability to combine traditional approaches with a contemporary attitude, and for his timeless storytelling sensibility. In addition to releasing a series of acclaimed albums, he’s lent his talents to a variety of theater and film projects, and collaborated with a wide range of prominent musicians from various genres, as well as having his songs covered by a broad array of notable artists. He’s also a vocal advocate for the preservation of the blues, and is active in charities that support music education.

Keb’s guitar playing has garnered him his third invite to Eric Clapton’s prestigious Crossroads Festival and has inspired leading instrument makers, Gibson Brands, to issue the Keb’ Mo’ Signature Bluesmaster and Bluesmaster Royale acoustic guitars and Martin Guitars to issue the HD-28KM Keb’ Mo’ Limited Edition Signature model. He has been featured in TV and film, playing Robert Johnson in the 1998 documentary Can’t You Hear the Wind Howl, appeared three times on the television series Touched By An Angel, played a leading role on Hallmark’s Signed, Sealed, Delivered: Higher Ground, and performed for President Obama at the White House.

“At some point, I began to realize that it’s not just about writing a good song with a good hook and good lyrics, but it’s also about writing songs that had something going on inside,” asserts Keb’, who, 9 years ago, moved his family from Los Angeles to Tennessee. “So I started spending a lot of time rewriting lyrics, recording, rerecording, and really working hard at it. I got to a place where I understood the anatomy of how lyrics can work, and how I can use them to put some substance into the song. It’s like jelly donuts. I don’t even like jelly donuts, but you know that every time you bite into one, there’s gonna be something inside. At some point, I realized that you have to tell a story in some way, shape or form, and this record is a continuation of that realization.”